Saturday, February 27, 2016

100 years ago this weekend


L-R: Mutual president, John Freuler, Syd Chaplin (then serving as his brother's business manager),
and CC at the contract signing. 

On Saturday, February 26th, 1916 at the Hotel Astor in New York City, Chaplin signed a contract with the Mutual Film Corporation for the unheard of amount of $10,000 a week plus a $150,000 bonus. The deal made him the highest paid filmmaker in history up to that time.

Shortly after the signing, Chaplin made a statement about his salary and what it meant to him:
"A great many people are inclined to make wide eyes at what is called my salary.  Honestly, it is a matter I do not spend much time thinking about. Money and business are very serious matters and I have to keep my mind off of them. In fact I do not worry about money at all. It would get in the way of my work. I do not want people to think that life is all a joke to me, but I do enjoy working on the sunny side of it. What this contract means is simply that I am in business with the worry left out and with the dividends guaranteed. It means that I am left free to be just as funny as I dare, to do the best work that is in me and to spend my energies on the thing that the people want. I have felt for a long-time that this would be my big year and this contract gives me my opportunity. There is inspiration in it. I am like an author with a big publisher to give him circulation." (Motography, March 11, 1916)
Chaplin looking serious on the day be became the richest man in Hollywood.
"It's got to be earned, you know," he said of the money.

2 comments:

  1. I have never noticed this before but did he have bad skin or is it just the quality of the photo? Sorry CC - not that it makes a bit of difference!

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    Replies
    1. I think it's the photo, not Charlie.

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